Logo F2FInterview

Android Interview Questions

Q   |   QA

It typically takes over a year to bring a device to market, but of course device manufacturers want to ship the latest software they can. Developers, meanwhile, don’t want to have to constantly track new versions of the platform when writing apps. Both groups experience a tension between shipping products, and not wanting to fall behind.

To address this, some parts of the next version of Android including the core platform APIs are developed in a private branch. These APIs constitute the next version of Android. Our aim is to focus attention on the current stable version of the Android source code, while we create the next version of the platform as driven by flagship Android devices. This allows developers and OEMs to focus on a single version without having to track unfinished future work just to keep up. Other parts of the Android system that aren’t related to application compatibility are developed in the open, however. It’s our intention to move more of these parts to open development over time.

When they are ready. Some parts of Android are developed in the open, so that source code is always available. Other parts are developed first in a private tree, and that source code is released when the next platform version is ready.

In some releases, core platform APIs will be ready far enough in advance that we can push the source code out for an early look in advance of the device’s release; however in others, this isn’t possible. In all cases, we release the platform source when we feel the version has stabilized enough, and when the development process permits. Releasing the source code is a fairly complex process.

Releasing the source code for a new version of the Android platform is a significant process. First, the software gets built into a system image for a device, and put through various forms of certification, including government regulatory certification for the regions the phones will be deployed. It also goes through operator testing. This is an important phase of the process, since it helps shake out a lot of software bugs.

Once the release is approved by the regulators and operators, the manufacturer begins mass producing devices, and we turn to releasing the source code.

Simultaneous to mass production the Google team kicks off several efforts to prepare the open source release. These efforts include final API changes and documentation (to reflect any changes that were made during qualification testing, for example), preparing an SDK for the new version, and launching the platform compatibility information.

Also included is a final legal sign-off to release the code into open source. Just as open source contributors are required to sign a Contributors License Agreement attesting to their IP ownership of their contribution, Google too must verify that it is clear to make contributions.

Starting at the time mass production begins, the software release process usually takes around a month, which often roughly places source code releases around the same time that the devices reach users.

The Android Open-Source Project maintains the Android software, and develops new versions. Since it’s open-source, this software can be used for any purpose, including to ship devices that are not compatible with other devices based on the same source.

The function of the Android Compatibility Program is to define a baseline implementation of Android that is compatible with third-party apps written by developers. Devices that are “Android compatible” may participate in the Android ecosystem, including Android Market; devices that don’t meet the compatibility requirements exist outside that ecosystem.

In other words, the Android Compatibility Program is how we separate “Android compatible devices” from devices that merely run derivatives of the source code. We welcome all uses of the Android source code, but only Android compatible devices — as defined and tested by the Android Compatibility Program — may participate in the Android ecosystem.

There are a number of ways you can contribute to Android. You can report bugs, write apps for Android, or contribute source code to the Android Open-Source Project.

There are some limits on the kinds of code contributions we are willing or able to accept. For instance, someone might want to contribute an alternative application API, such as a full C++-based environment. We would decline that contribution, since Android is focused on applications that run in the Dalvik VM. Alternatively, we won’t accept contributions such as GPL or LGPL libraries that are incompatible with our licensing goals.

We encourage those interested in contributing source code to contact us via the AOSP Community page prior to beginning any work. You can find more information on this topic at the Getting Involved page.

In order to link this F2FInterview's page as Reference on your website or Blog, click on below text area and pres (CTRL-C) to copy the code in clipboard or right click then copy the following lines after that paste into your website or Blog.

Get Reference Link To This Page: (copy below code by (CTRL-C) and paste into your website or Blog)
HTML Rendering of above code: