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Python Interview Questions

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As the name specifies list holds a list of data items in an orderly manner. Sequence of data items can be present in a list. In python you have to specify a list of items with a comma and to make it understand that we are specifying a list we have to enclose the statement in square brackets. List can be altered at any time.

A dictionary is a place where you will find and store information on address, contact details, etc. In python you need to associate keys with values. This key should be unique because it is useful for retrieving information. Also note that strings should be passed as keys in python. Notice that keys are to be separated by a colon and the pairs are separated themselves by commas. The whole statement is enclosed in curly brackets.

Tuples, lists and strings are some examples about sequence. Python supports two main operations which are indexing and slicing. Indexing operation allows you to fetch a particular item in the sequence and slicing operation allows you to retrieve an item from the list of sequence. Python starts from the beginning and if successive numbers are not specified it starts at the last. In python the start position is included but it stops before the end statement.

Many people used to C or Perl complain that they want to use this C idiom:

while (line = readline(f)) {
...do something with line...
}

where in Python you're forced to write this:

while True:
line = f.readline()
if not line:
break
...do something with line...

The reason for not allowing assignment in Python expressions is a common, hard-to-find bug in those other languages, caused by this construct:

if (x = 0) {
...error handling...
}
else {
...code that only works for nonzero x...
}

The error is a simple typo: x = 0, which assigns 0 to the variable x, was written while the comparison x == 0 is certainly what was intended. Many alternatives have been proposed. Most are hacks that save some typing but use arbitrary or cryptic syntax or keywords, and fail the simple criterion for language change proposals: it should intuitively suggest the proper meaning to a human reader who has not yet been introduced to the construct. An interesting phenomenon is that most experienced Python programmers recognize the "while True" idiom and don't seem to be missing the assignment in expression construct much; it's only newcomers who express a strong desire to add this to the language. There's an alternative way of spelling this that seems attractive but is generally less robust than the "while True" solution:

line = f.readline()
while line:
...do something with line...
line = f.readline()

The problem with this is that if you change your mind about exactly how you get the next line (e.g. you want to change it into sys.stdin.readline()) you have to remember to change two places in your program -- the second occurrence is hidden at the bottom of the loop.
The best approach is to use iterators, making it possible to loop through objects using the for statement. For example, in the current version of Python file objects support the iterator protocol, so you can now write simply:

for line in f:
... do something with line...

Yes.
PyChecker is a static analysis tool that finds bugs in Python source code and warns about code complexity and style.

Pylint is another tool that checks if a module satisfies a coding standard, and also makes it possible to write plug-ins to add a custom feature. 

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