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CSS Interview Questions

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By classifying each set of links and then attaching desired color to each set.
CSS:
<style type="text/css">
<!--
A.set1:link {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}
A.set1:visited {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}
A.set1:active {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}

A.set2:link {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}
A.set2:visited {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}
A.set2:active {color: some_color; background: some_background_color}
-->
</style>

You can name set1 and set2 any way you like as long as the names are made up of letters a-z, A-Z, digits 0-9, period, hyphen, escaped characters, Unicode characters 161-255, as well as any Unicode character as a numeric code.
Note: to avoid conflict with user's settings a background property (background color) should also be specified together with the color property (foreground color).

In theory, the following will produce 4 "columns":
<DIV style="float: left; width: 25%;">Block 1</DIV>
<DIV style="float: left; width: 25%;">Block 2</DIV>
<DIV style="float: left; width: 25%;">Block 3</DIV>
<DIV style="float: left; width: 25%;">Block 4</DIV>

Each "column" will occupy 25% of the screen. This relies on a correct implementation of float, which cannot be said of many legacy browsers. If you cannot accept display variances in older browsers, then it may be best to fall back to table-based solutions.

2. By making the block an inline element and then use text-align property

<DIV STYLE="text-align: center">
<TABLE STYLE="display: inline">
...
</TABLE>
</DIV>

This technique depends on the incorrect implementation of text-align behavior in older browsers. It will likely cease to work in future CSS-conformant browsers, and eventually it will probably not be a viable solution. 

Document Style Semantics and Specification Language is an international standard, an expression language, a styling language for associating processing (formatting and transformation) with SGML documents, for example XML. 

XSL is a proposed styling language for formatting XML (eXtensible Markup Language) documents. The proposal was submitted to the W3C by Microsoft, Inso, and ArborText. 

The simple answer is "None" which is why CSS offers five generic font names as 'serif', 'sans-serif', 'cursive', 'fantasy' and 'monospace'. Never put any of these generic font names in quotes.

A CSS aware browser should make a suitable choice from the available fonts in response to each of those generic names.
Specifying any other font name in a www environment comes out as a suggestion only, that may or may not be acknowledged by a browser.
The problem with using names of specific fonts is that there is little point in naming fonts that few users will have, so you're down to listing a few mass-market font names. This will then override any superior selection that a minority of discerning readers may have made for themselves.
Note also that fonts may differ in their character repertoire, but this is often not evident from the font name itself: by selecting an inappropriate font name, you might prevent internationalized content from displaying correctly for a proportion of users. 

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