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JMS Interview Questions

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ObjectMessage contains a Serializable java object as it's payload. Thus it allows exchange of Java objects between applications. This itself mandates that both the applications be Java applications. The consumer of the message must typecast the object received to it's appropriate type. Thus the consumer should beforehand know the actual type of the object sent by the sender. Wrong type casting would result in ClassCastException. Moreover the class definition of the object set in the payload should be available on the machine, the sender as well as the consumer. If the class definition is not available in the consumer machine, an attempt to type cast would result in ClassNotFoundException. Some of the MOMs might support dynamic loading of the desired class over the network, but the JMS specification does not mandate this behaviour and would be a value added service if provided by your vendor. And relying on any such vendor specific functionality would hamper the portability of your application. Most of the time the class need to be put in the classpath of both, the sender and the consumer, manually by the developer.

BytesMessage stores the primitive data types by converting them to their byte representation. Thus the message is one contiguous stream of bytes. While the StreamMessage maintains a boundary between the different data types stored because it also stores the type information along with the value of the primitive being stored. BytesMessage allows data to be read using any type. Thus even if your payload contains a long value, you can invoke a method to read a short and it will return you something. It will not give you a semantically correct data but the call will succeed in reading the first two bytes of data. This is strictly prohibited in the StreamMessage. It maintains the type information of the data being stored and enforces strict conversion rules on the data being read.

With point-to-point message passing the sending application/client establishes a named message queue in the JMS broker/server and sends messages to this queue. The receiving client registers with the broker to receive messages posted to this queue. There is a one-to-one relationship between the sending and receiving clients.

The answers are no to the first question and yes to the second. The JMS specification does not require that one JMS provider be able to send messages directly to another provider. However, the specification does require that a JMS client must be able to accept a message created by a different JMS provider, so a message received by a subscriber to Provider A can then be published to Provider B. One caveat is that the publisher to Provider B is not required to handle a JMSReplyTo header that refers to a destination that is specific to Provider A.

If the JMS server experiences a failure, for example, a power outage, any message that it is holding in primary storage potentially could be lost. With persistent storage, the JMS server logs every message to secondary storage. (The logging occurs on the front end, that is, as part of handling the send operation from the message producing client.) The logged message is removed from secondary storage only after it has been successfully delivered to all consuming clients.  

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